the psychology of naming


It’s interesting to think about the subliminal effects of naming - for example,  a Facebook friend versus a Linkedin connection. Even if it’s the same person, we tend to be in a different mode of interaction with him or her depending on the site. Do we project “friendship” with our Facebook contacts, at least for the duration of interaction on the Facebook site?

At the Business of Community Networking Conference where we both spoke last week, Liz Strauss made a great point about the naming on Facebook Pages. To join the Page community, you “Become a fan” versus, say, “Join group.” Does this result in people writing fewer negative comments on Pages? We can’t hate on a product if we’re its fan, right? Interesting psychology for us to ponder…

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3 Responses to “the psychology of naming”

  1. Gadi Shamia Says:

    Love the direction you picked with the Facebook Era. I just ordered one (chiching…)
    As for the psychology of names: I think that become a fan represents less commitment that join a group and this is what is behind this choice. Your comment is valid as well, but I think it is secondary. Facebook goal is (1) get a large crowd fanning a page and (2) make sure the page is useful and positive.

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